Tag Archives: windows 10 pro

Why Is There a Lock Icon on Drives & How To Take it off

Wondering why there is a padlock icon in your drives in the File Explorer? Here is what it’s and the way to remove lock icon from drives in Windows 10.

If you bought a new laptop or desktop in recent years, you may have noticed that all of your drives have a lock icon in it. This is true for Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro versions and whether you’re actively using BitLocker or disabled it outright. Generally, a lock icon on the drive means that it is encrypted in some way. As possible guess, encryption causes it to be harder for others to access your computer data in unauthorized ways. For example, if you lost your laptop, the one that thought it was cannot access the data without proper authentication.

Although the feature is pretty useful, it may be confusing for some. After all, Windows 10 doesn’t do a sufficient job of informing you of the items the lock icon within the drives means, how it’s enabled, and how to remove it as needed.

In this simple Windows 10 article, without a doubt why there is a lock icon in your drive and just how the remove lock icon on drive in Windows 10.

Exactly why is there a lock icon on drives in Windows 10?

Windows 10 has two built-in encryption features. The first one is BitLocker and it is only accessible for Pro and Enterprise users. The 2nd one is called Device Encryption and open to all including Windows 10 Home users.

If you’re visiting a lock icon on the drives so if you’re using Windows 10 Home or you are certain that you aren’t using BitLocker then it is because of the Device Encryption feature.

Though the Device Encryption feature is available to all Windows 10 users, it’s automatically enabled only when the next requirements are met.

Your laptop or desktop should have a TPM version 2 (Trusted Platform Module) chip on the motherboard.
Supports the Modern Standby feature.
Has modern UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface).
The TPM functionality is enabled via UEFI.
You should log into Windows 10 with a Microsoft account.

If you are not using BitLocker and don’t want to use the unit Encryption feature, follow the steps given below to turn off Device Encryption and remove the lock icon from drives in Windows 10.

BitLocker vs Device Encryption

Both BitLocker and Device Encryption are similar. It’s exactly that, unlike BitLocker, Device Encryption is available to any or all but is only turned on automatically when the system has got the built-in TPM module and signed in to Microsoft account. In addition to that, you won’t get any from the management options to configure the unit Encryption feature.

You can imagine Device Encryption like a stripped-down version of BitLocker with the same security standards however with no management options.

How to remove lock icon on drives in Windows 10

To remove the lock icon on drives in Windows 10, you have to disable the Device Encryption feature. Here is how to do it.

Open the Settings app in Windows 10.
Click on “Update & Security.”
Select “Device Encryption” around the sidebar.
Click “Turn off” around the right panel.
Device encryption is now disabled and also the lock icon is taken away from drives.

First, open the Windows 10 Settings app with “Start key + I” keyboard shortcut. In the Settings app, visit the “Update & Security -> Device Encryption” page. Around the right panel, click the “Turn Off” button under the Device encryption section.

As soon as you click on the button, Windows 10 turns off the Device Encryption feature and automatically decrypts all encrypted drives. The decryption process will require some time to complete. You can use the system normally although this is happening. From now on, providing see the lock icon on the drives in Windows 10.

Note: If you work with BitLocker, you need to turn off BitLocker to remove the lock icon.

How to Enable & Open GPEdit in Windows 10 Home

Having a simple trick, you can open the gpedit tool in Windows 10 Home. All you have to do is enable the group policy editor in Windows 10 Home. This is how.

Should you running Windows 10 Home edition then you cannot apply certain tools and features which are exclusive to Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise editions. The audience Policy Editor or also referred to as gpedit is one such tool. Using the Group Policy Editor, you can set and enforce specific policies on the Windows system. What makes the audience Policy Editor special is its ease of use and also the ability to behave as a central place for many advanced Windows settings.

In the absence of the gpedit tool, you can use the registry editor to configure the majority of those settings. However, as most of you realize, the registry editor is not that user-friendly so if you’re not careful, there’s a high amount of chance for things to go wrong.

That being said, Microsoft blocking access to gpedit in Windows 10 Home is definitely an artificial restriction. This means that having a simple trick, you are able to open gpedit in Windows 10 Home. All you need to do is install gpedit in Windows 10 home and configure several settings and you’re simply all set. Without further delay, let me show you how you can do it.

Important note: To enable gpedit.msc in Windows 10, we need to use a third-party app that will make changes somewhere files. So, before proceeding any more, I suggest you produce a system restore point and make up a full system backup. Also, stick to the steps below at the own risk.

Open gpedit in Windows 10 Home

To set up and open gpedit in Windows 10 Home follow the steps listed below.

1. To allow the audience policy editor in Windows 10 home, we must make use of a free application called Add GPEDIT. So, go ahead and download the zip file in the developer page.

2. After downloading the app, open the File Explorer and go to the “C:\Windows\SysWOW64” folder. You can simply copy the path, paste it in the address bar and press Enter to go to the target folder. Here, copy the “GroupPolicy” and “GroupPolicyUsers” folders. You are able to select these two folders at the same time by holding down the Ctrl button and clicking on them.

3. Now, open the downloaded zip file, extract it, and double-click around the “setup.exe” file. Follow the installation wizard. When you’re at the conclusion, don’t click the Finish button. Just close the installer by hitting the “X” icon at the top-right corner.

4. Open the File Explorer, type “C:\Windows\Temp\gpedit” in the address bar and press Enter.

5. Right-click on the “x86.bat” file and choose “Edit.”

6. Once is file is opened in the Notepad, replace all instances of %username%:f with “%username%”:f. If you’re wondering, all we did was add quotes around %username%.

7. Save the file with “Ctrl + S” shortcut and close it.

8. Within the File Explorer window, right-click around the “x86.bat” file and choose the “Run as administrator” option. This course of action will install the gpedit in Windows 10 and adds all the necessary DLL files that are needed to operate the tool.

That’s all. It is that simple to install the group policy editor in Windows 10 home. After installing, you can open the group policy editor by executing the gpedit.msc run command.

Do keep in mind that even though you have access towards the Group Policy Editor, some features and options will still be unavailable for you. It is because the modules and snap-ins related to those settings featuring might not be readily available for Home users. Nevertheless, having some access is preferable to no access.

How to Enable & Open GPEdit in Windows 10 Home

With a simple trick, you are able to open the gpedit tool in Windows 10 Home. All you have to do is let the group policy editor in Windows 10 Home. This is how.

Should you running Windows 10 Home edition then you cannot use some tools and features that are only at Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise editions. The audience Policy Editor or also referred to as gpedit is one such tool. Using the Group Policy Editor, you can set and enforce specific policies on the Windows system. Why is the audience Policy Editor special is its simplicity of use and the capability to act as a central place for many advanced Windows settings.

Even without the the gpedit tool, you can use the registry editor to configure most of those settings. However, as most of you realize, the registry editor is not that user-friendly and if you are not careful, there’s a high amount of chance for items to fail.

That being said, Microsoft blocking access to gpedit in Windows 10 Home is an artificial restriction. This means that having a simple trick, you can open gpedit in Windows 10 Home. All you have to do is install gpedit in Windows 10 home and configure several settings and you’re simply good to go. Without further delay, allow me to show you how you can get it done.

Important note: To enable gpedit.msc in Windows 10, we have to make use of a third-party app that will make changes to the system files. So, before proceeding any further, I recommend you create a system restore point and make up a full system backup. Also, follow the steps below at your own risk.

Open gpedit in Windows 10 Home

To set up and open gpedit in Windows 10 Home follow the steps listed below.

1. To allow the group policy editor in Windows 10 home, we must make use of a free application called Add GPEDIT. So, go ahead and download the zip file in the developer page.

2. After downloading the app, open the File Explorer and visit the “C:\Windows\SysWOW64” folder. You can just copy the path, paste it within the address bar and press Enter to visit the target folder. Here, copy the “GroupPolicy” and “GroupPolicyUsers” folders. You can select these two folders at the same time by holding on the Ctrl button and hitting them.

3. Now, open the downloaded zip file, extract it, and double-click around the “setup.exe” file. Stick to the installation wizard. When you are at the end, don?¡¥t click the Finish button. Just close the installer by clicking on the “X” icon in the top-right corner.

4. Open the File Explorer, type “C:\Windows\Temp\gpedit” within the address bar and press Enter.

5. Right-click on the “x86.bat” file and select “Edit.”

6. Once is file is opened in the Notepad, replace all cases of %username%:f with “%username%”:f. If you’re wondering, all we did was add quotes around %username%.

7. Save the file with “Ctrl + S” shortcut and close it.

8. In the File Explorer window, right-click on the “x86.bat” file and choose the “Run as administrator” option. This course of action will install the gpedit in Windows 10 and adds all the necessary DLL files that are required to operate the tool.

That is all. It is that simple to set up the group policy editor in Windows 10 home. After installing, you are able to open the audience policy editor by executing the gpedit.msc run command.

Do remember that even though you have access to the Group Policy Editor, some features and options it’s still unavailable to you. This is because the modules and snap-ins related to those settings featuring may not be available for Home users. Nevertheless, having some access is better than no access.

How to Completely Disable Lock Screen in Windows 10

To prevent users from locking Windows 10 computer, follow the steps given below to disable the lock screen in Windows 10.

Any user in Windows can lock the machine by pressing the “Win + L” keyboard shortcut. Actually, you will find multiple ways to lock the Windows screen. This particular feature is extremely helpful when you’re disappearing from the system but don’t want others to access it. When you lock the machine, others will not be able to use the machine when they don’t know the password or pin. As needed, you can also configure Windows 10 to lock automatically after a little inactivity.

Just like the power lock the screen is, there might be situations when you need to prevent lock screen in Windows 10. For instance, in work environments, you might not want a specific computer from being locked as it may prevent other users by using it. This kind of scenario can also be applicable to family computers where it’s very common to share exactly the same user account with multiple people.

Regardless of reason, if you don’t want Windows to lock screen, you can simply disable Windows 10 lock screen.

Group Policy to Disable Windows 10 Lock Screen – GPO

Windows 10 Pro users can use the audience Policy to disable the lock screen. Stick to the steps as shown below.

Click the Windows answer to open the beginning menu.
Type “Edit group policy”.
Click on the Edit Group Policy to spread out the audience Policy Editor.
In the policy editor, go to the “Computer configuration → Administrative template → User interface → Personalization” folder.
Double-click around the “Do not display the lock screen” policy. You can find it around the right panel.
Choose the “Enabled” option.
Click on the “Apply” and “Ok” buttons.
Close the audience policy editor.
Restart Windows 10.

After restarting the system, the modified policy is fully enabled. From here onwards, no user around the system can lock Windows. To revert the change, set the policy status to “Not configured” in step 6.

Registry Answer to Disable Lock Screen in Windows 10

By allowing the “NoLockScreen” registry value, it is simple to disable the Windows 10 lock screen. Without having access towards the group policy editor, follow this method.

Open the Run window. You are able to press “Win + R” to open it.
Type “regedit” and click on “Ok”.
After opening the Registry Editor, go to the below folder in it.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows
Right-click around the “Windows” folder.
Select “New → Key”.
Name the new folder as “Personalization”.
Right-click around the “Personalization” folder.
Choose the “New → DWORD value” option.
Set the name as “NoLockScreen”.
Double-click around the dword value you simply created.
Type “1” within the Value Data field.
Click “Ok” to create the value.
Close the Registry Editor.
Restart Windows.

After restarting the Windows, it’ll no more allow users to lock the screen. With this, you’ve successfully disabled the Windows lock screen. To revert the change and let the lock screen, delete the “NoLockScreen” value or change its Value Data to “0”.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go Could Launch Now with Hardware Surprises

We’ve known for a while that Microsoft was planning to launch a new more affordable Surface laptop, and now it looks like we’re just a few days from the moment an announcement is made.

First and foremost, how come Microsoft absolutely need a less expensive Surface device?

Microsoft’s Surface lineup has always been considered a premium series, using the company itself once saying that its purpose ended up being to pioneer new products, leaving its partners and the remaining industry to construct devices with various configurations available at different price levels.

So theoretically, Microsoft wanted to give the the best, giving hardware makers the opportunity to launch similar products offered at a lower price.

The company, however, knows how important it is to stay relevant in all markets, so in addition to the premium models, it also launched the top Go, a smaller and cheaper device whose purpose ended up being to go after customers within the education market.

Obviously, the top Go hasn’t necessarily been probably the most successful model ever released by the software giant, however it was used like a product which paved the way for any long-term approach. Which long-term approach features a new Surface laptop too.

Codenamed Surface Sparti, this new model had the ability to launch as Surface Laptop Go, according to a new report from German site WinFuture. Worth knowing, however, is that this Surface Laptop Go moniker isn’t official just now, although it should be rather sooner than later, as Microsoft is anticipated to officially announce the new device included in a digital event on October 1. At the same time, there’s a chance the company actually surrenders on an event and just releases the unit on its key markets, including the Usa, with a press announcement published on its website.

The Surface Laptop Go will probably have a number of hardware surprises that aren’t necessarily something that Microsoft is a big fan of. However, these changes are absolutely needed in order to keep the price at a lower level.

Based on the cited source, the brand new laptop could be run by the 10th-gen Core i5-1035G1, and it’s believed that Microsoft would even release a version targeted at the training with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of flash memory. That’s right, no SSD but flash memory, and it’s thought that all versions of this mysterious Surface model could adopt exactly the same approach.

Quite simply, all configurations can use flash memory, due to the fact it’s cheaper than an SSD, though, on top version, you can get some 256GB of storage.

The brand new Surface laptop could even lack Windows Hello face recognition, but because biometric authentication is a big part of Microsoft’s passwordless future, the organization will instead choose a fingerprint sensor. The brand new reader will be built-into the ability button, the report adds.

The base form of this new Surface could run Windows 10 in S Mode, however, users will be permitted to upgrade fully form of Windows 10 is required. At the same time, the greater expensive configurations will run Windows 10 Pro as they are.

Needless to say, Microsoft has remained completely tight-lipped on everything until now, though it is obvious that this type of device virtually is sensible in the long-term, specially in the education market in which the competition is getting fiercer. If the new laptop is announced on October 1, expect the first customers within the U.S. to get their hands on it after the month.

Windows Update KB4559309 Causing Performance Issues on Windows 10

KB4559309 is a reasonably controversial Windows update, as it’s the one which the software giant accustomed to push the brand new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser to Windows 10 devices running version 1803 through 2004.

Many users didn’t agree with this aggressive approach and criticized Microsoft for forcing the brand new browser on then, some turning to the advantage Blocker Toolkit to prevent the app from being installed.

But leaving all of this controversy aside, it looks like there’s another thing to bother with when it comes to update KB4559309: users on Microsoft’s forums are now complaining that this update causes performance issues, including slow booting and massive slowdowns once in a while.

Spotted by WL, the thread also reveals that Microsoft is currently investigating the problem, until then, no information as to whether a fix obtained care of or not is available. The Microsoft Edge team needs more details on what is happening before it may share an ETA for the fix.

A few of the issues reported after installing update KB4559309 on the Windows 10 device range from the following:

Slow boot
Failed installation of the update
PC slow randomly times
Wireless network disabled
Slow network connection
Video and audio freezing
Huge memory usage

Obviously, a few of the damage that is mentioned here may not be directly brought on by the advantage update, but users say that they noticed them after installing it.

So technically, once Microsoft shipped this update on Windows Update for these computers, the aforementioned problems were noticed by the people with them, therefore the company looking into the whole thing is actually the right way to go right now.

Is there whatever you can perform about this at this point?

Users in the linked thread are looking into a variety of workarounds, and some say that disabling BitLocker sometimes fixes the performance issues on their own devices. Others claim that turning off the fast startup deals with the slow boot glitch that they’re seeing.

But on the other hand, there’s no workaround that will the trick for everybody, so at this time, it’s pretty clear that Microsoft must come up with a fix.

Windows update KB4559309 is just shipped to Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro devices, as the company doesn’t provide the new Edge update to Enterprise devices.

“This update is not meant to target Enterprise devices. Specifically, this update targets devices that run Windows 10 version 1803 or later versions which are either Home Edition or Pro Edition. Devices running Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro Edition that are joined for an Active Directory or Azure Active Directory domain, or are WSUS or WUfB managed, are also excluded from this automatic update,” the company explains.

The update should really bring the brand new Chromium-powered Edge browser to Windows 10 devices, so when this occurs, the legacy form of the app becomes a second-class citizen of the operating-system.

The new Edge imports the majority of the data from the predecessor, including passwords, favorites, and open tabs, whilst overtaking shortcuts, Start menu pins, tiles, and anything else.

In other words, once the update is installed and the Chromium engine opens up on your device, Project Spartan becomes only a piece of history, as it’ll be hidden around the OS – ought to be fact, Microsoft says that Edge legacy won’t be removed completely, but it’ll stay there for compatibility reasons; however, there’s no doubt that sooner or later Microsoft will just pull the browser completely, probably when the transition towards the Chromium successor is finished.

Microsoft Acknowledges Windows Sandbox Launch Error on Windows 10 1903 and Newer

Windows Sandbox is a feature bundled with Windows 10 version 1903 and newer, and it allows users to operate another demonstration of the operating-system which makes it possible to test apps and services securely.

A lot more like an online machine that comes with Windows 10, the separate OS instance runs in a sandbox, and never only that all system files are protected, but all changes are automatically reset once the application is closed.

Needless to say, Windows Sandbox addresses a lot of users’ need of a secure testing environment and makes deploying apps like VirtualBox and others fairly unnecessary.

But as it sometimes happens in the Windows world, you will find things that occasional break down, and this time, it’s Windows Sandbox’s turn to hit this issue. Fortunately, there’s an easy fix for users encountering this, so continue reading to discover everything about this latest bug within the Windows world.

Based on Microsoft itself, there’s now a launch error that affects both Windows Sandbox and Windows Defender Application Guard, or WDAG. Quite simply, if you try to operate any of these two, you end up with an error preventing you against using them.

The issue happens on the following Windows 10 versions (keep in mind that Windows Sandbox debuted in Windows 10 version 1903, so any versions of the operating system that are over the age of this won’t include the feature built-in):

Windows 10 Pro, version 1903
Windows 10 Enterprise, version 1903
Windows 10 Pro, version 1909
Windows 10 Enterprise, version 1909
Windows 10 Pro, version 2004
Windows 10 Enterprise, version 2004

Worth noting would be that the issue is also experienced on Windows 10 version 2004, the most recent feature update that Microsoft rolled out it. This version is currently being made available to users in phases, but part of those who have already received the update might thus struggle to run Windows Sandbox or WDAG.

And also the error which you may experience, as explained by Microsoft in a support document spotted by TechDows, reads the next:
ERROR_VSMB_SAVED_STATE_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0xC0370400)” or “E_PATHNOTFOUND (0x80070003)

There’s only one workaround available right now, based on Microsoft, and it’s actually much easier than you’d expect it to be. And all you have to do is reboot the computer.

“To mitigate this problem after receiving one of the above error messages, you will have to restart your device,” Microsoft says.

As for a complete fix, the software giant explains that it’s already working on it, which you ought to participate a future update. At this point, however, no specifics have been provided on the ETA s to once the patch may go love users.

Important to note, however, is that the next Patch Tuesday cycle takes place on August 11 – this is actually the date when Microsoft will release new cumulative updates for those Windows 10 versions, and likewise to security fixes, the organization also typically resolves some non-security problems too. Right now, however, we don’t have a confirmation the August Patch Tuesday is supposed to resolve this problem.

Windows Sandbox is only on Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise SKUs, therefore if you’re running the Home version, the feature isn’t there. Users also need to enable it manually on Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise in the optional features screen in the operating-system.

However, users can also manually enable Windows Sandbox in Windows 10 Home too using a custom batch file that needs to operate on a tool running at least version 1903.

How you can Block Windows 10 19H2 (Version 1909)

It’s that point of the season once again, as Microsoft is getting ready to to produce new feature update for Windows 10 and individuals are concerned that setting it up would do more harm than good.

While Windows 10 19H2, also referred to as version 1909, won’t bring a lot of substantial changes, so the likelihood of bugs hitting your system is lower this time around, customers still want to take part in the safe card and block the update from installing.

All of this comes from the October 2018 Update fiasco, when Microsoft released an element update for Windows 10 only to pull it a few days later after discovering a bug potentially removing user files stored in libraries. The update was re-published greater than a month later but not without bugs though, a lot of chose to just skip the October update and wait for a next release instead.

When it comes to Windows 10 19H2, however, there’s very little to bother with, due to the fact this update comes with a rather small changelog and is mostly supposed to create a brand new delivery system for feature updates.

Microsoft will release Windows 10 19H2 like a cumulative update, therefore the whole update process ought to be faster and run smoother.

Of course, such promises don’t mean anything for users who wound up without their files after a feature update, so blocking Windows 10 19H2 continues to be only option going forward.

Fortunately, this really is something that you can now do with just a few clicks, and the same steps in the previous feature updates operate in this example as well.

First of all, if you’re running Windows 10 Pro, the easiest way to bar the installation of an element update is appropriate there within the Settings app. So boot to Windows 10 after which check out this path:

Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced options

Basically, the option that you are looking for is gloomier in this article and is called:

A feature update includes new capabilities and improvements. It can be deferred with this a number of days

Windows 10 thus enables you to choose for how long you want to push back installing a brand new feature update after it’s offered to your device. When you’re prepared to do the installation, just go back to value 0 and you ought to have the ability to install it normally.

Pausing updates works too, albeit in this instance, the installation of updates is pushed back for any more 35 days. If you’re OK with this, then this option is simpler to configure because you only have to click the toggle in the very same screen.

However, should you run Windows 10 Home, you must create a new registry key in the following location:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsUpdate\UX\Settings

There’s two DWORD 32-bit Value keys you need to create within order to delay installing feature updates. They are called:

BranchReadinessLevel
DeferFeatureUpdatesPeriodInDays

The values that you must use to activate the update deferral would be the following:

BranchReadinessLevel value = 10 (Semi-Annual Channel Targeted)
DeferFeatureUpdatesPeriodInDays = 0-365 (the number of days that you want to make use of)

Microsoft hasn’t yet shared any specifics around the Windows 10 version 1909 rollout, however this should start anytime soon. October 8, addressing the next month’s Patch Tuesday cycle, could be the right moment to get this done, as Windows 10 19H2 would land in the form of a cumulative update anyway. An announcement in this regard, however, is still pending.

Three Tips to Use Windows Defender Antivirus in Windows 10 Like a Pro

Windows Defender became one from the top security solutions in the Windows ecosystem, and also the recent antivirus tests virtually speak for themselves.

Once an antivirus application that many people avoided, Windows Defender now supplies a fully-featured protection system that’s comparable to those of leading security vendors, including here Kaspersky and Bitdefender.

And truth be told, Microsoft has indeed put a lot of effort into getting Windows Defender right, so at this time, this name doesn’t just represent an antivirus product pre-installed in Windows, but a full suite of security measures that everybody running Microsoft’s desktop OS gets automatically.

Windows Defender, which has evolved being Windows Peace of mind in Windows 10, now groups every security-related feature or setting in the operating-system, from the antivirus engine and account protection to parental controls and device health.

And since Windows Defender has become such a complex security product, many people have a hard time taking advantage of its features. As the default configuration does the project for the majority of Windows 10 adopters, listed here are three tips that you can use to use Windows Defender just like a pro.

Automatic daily scans

Windows Defender comes with security measures that you find in the majority of top antivirus products on the market, including real-time protection, so that all your files are scanned before running, and cloud-delivered protection to use cloud power in order to block the latest threats.

What it lacks, however, is an option to run a computerized daily scan at a time that you simply decide. Fortunately, this is where Windows 10 involves the rescue, because the built-in Task Schedule can help you using the event.

Full information about how to set up a computerized scan in Windows Defender are available in my tutorial here, and at the same time frame, if you’re running Windows 10 Pro, you can use the Group Policy Editor to set up policies for daily scans. The location of the policies is the following:

Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Defender Antivirus > Scan

Enable ransomware protection

The newest features put into Windows Defender, and that we think everyone should enable on Windows 10, is ransomware protection.

Ransomware became one of the most common threats for organizations and home users alike, and because recovering when it comes to a successful attack isn’t something that’s super easy to complete, having dedicated software to bar such an attempt is crucial.

Windows Defender includes built-in protection for files, folders, and memory areas against any unauthorized changes by applications that you don’t trust. To allow it, head over to:

Windows Security > Virus & threat protection > Ransomware protection > Controlled folder access

Click on the toggle to allow the feature and you’re then ready to go.

Configure network rules

In addition to antivirus protection, Windows Defender now offers firewall and network controls, so you can configure rules for three different types of network:
Domain network – Networks at a workplace which are joined to some domain
Private network – Trusted networks at home or at the office
Public network – Public networks like airports and restaurants

Obviously, you should enable the firewall for all three, but simultaneously, you can also define special rules for incoming connections. This really is recommended especially in the case of the public networks where your device (and traffic) is much more subjected to people you don’t know.

If something goes wrong, you can always reset settings to the original configuration from:

Windows Security > Firewall & network protection > Restore firewalls to default

Microsoft expects the ‘majority of customers’ to make use of Windows 10’s S mode

Microsoft expects the “majority of customers” will enjoy Windows 10 in the new S mode, Microsoft’s corporate v . p . of Windows wrote in a blog post Wednesday night.

The stunning endorsement of Windows 10’s S mode-which was formally confirmed as a mode of Windows 10 nearly each day ago-was made by Joe Belfiore, who explained via Twitter he expected the transition to occur in 2019. Belfiore’s blog post set a much more aggressive timetable, claiming that customers would be able to purchase a PC with Windows 10 S mode at or close to the time once the next feature update to Windows 10 drops. That update, referred to as Redstone 4, is anticipated to look on PCs at the begining of April.

But for people who don’t want Windows 10’s S mode, there’s another important change: Whether customers choose a PC with Windows 10 Home, Windows 10 Pro, or perhaps a commercial version, the upgrade from S mode fully versions of Windows 10 will be free.

“Starting with the next update to Windows 10, not far off, customers can choose to buy a new Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro PC with S mode enabled, and commercial customers can deploy Windows 10 Enterprise with S mode enabled,” Belfiore wrote.

Whether Windows 10’s S mode is the default mode for new Windows 10 PCs appears like a moot question at this point. Though only the Surface Laptop and a small number of educational devices use Windows 10 S, Belfiore made a bold claim: “We expect nearly all customers to benefit from the benefits of Windows 10 in S mode,” he wrote.

Microsoft clearly expects new devices to use Windows 10 S in the future. Though Belfiore didn’t provide details, he did say there are more than twenty devices with Windows 10 S enabled. “We expect to see new Windows 10 devices ship with S mode, available from our partners in the coming months, so check back here for updates,” Belfiore added.

In his comments on Twitter Tuesday night, Belfiore characterized Windows 10’s S mode because the “‘low-hassle’/ guaranteed performance version” of Windows. Belfiore called out the security, faster boot time, better life of the battery and consistent performance that Windows 10’s S mode produces. Windows 10’s S mode blocks the operating system by using traditional Win32 apps, allowing only apps in the Windows Store instead.

Belfiore reiterated that positioning in the Wednesday post, calling Windows 10’s S mode a Windows experience that was “streamlined for security and performance across all [of] our editions.”

It’s unclear whether PC makers will offer Windows 10’s S mode like a configurable option, though that seems likely. What we now know, though, is the fact that Windows 10’s S mode is much more vital that you Microsoft than it originally seemed.

Why this matters: Belfiore’s bold claims about the projected market share for Windows 10 S/Windows 10’s S mode potentially change the market dramatically. If over 50 percent from the market uses Windows 10’s S mode, traditional UWP apps and upcoming Progressive Web Apps will end up far more important within the Microsoft ecosystem. Who knows what the future may hold?